Vancouver Island Masonic History Project

As part of our Vancouver Island Masonic History Project we are compiling a list of Vancouver Island Buildings Associated With Freemasons.

This page on Vancouver Island Buildings Associated With Freemasons – Victoria, B.C. is currently UNDER CONSTRUCTION.

Here are some examples of buildings associated with Freemasons in Victoria, British Columbia, listed in chronological order:

901-905 Government Street, Victoria. Built in 1858 but later owned by Stephen Jones, who added 602 Courtney Street to this building in 1913. (phot by Temple Lodge No. 33 Historian)
901-905 Government Street, Victoria. Built in 1858 but later owned by Stephen Jones, who added 602 Courtney Street to this building in 1913. (photo by Temple Lodge No. 33 Historian)

901-905 Government Street

This historic building at 901-905 Government Street in downtown Victoria was originally built in 1858 as Victoria’s first brick hotel.

It was purchased by Stephen Jones, circa 1900. In 1913 Stephen Jones added a new structure to the rear of this building at 602 Courtney Street. Both buildings are still legally consolidated for tax purposes and both are listed together on the Canadian Register of Historic Places.

 

 

 

Congregation Emanu-El Synagogue, 1461 Blanshard Street, Victoria, B.C.
Congregation Emanu-El Synagogue, 1461 Blanshard Street, Victoria, B.C.

Congregation Emanu-El Synagogue, 1461 Blanshard Street. Built in 1863.

Victoria Freemasons laid the cornerstone in 1863. Lumley Franklin, Victoria’s second Mayor and a Charter member of B.C.’s first Masonic lodge, was Congregation Emanu-El President and raised funds for the building’s construction.

 

1117-1129 Wharf Street was once the business premises of Robert Paterson Rithet's firm, R.P. Rithet & Company.
1117-1129 Wharf Street was once the business premises of Robert Paterson Rithet‘s firm, R.P. Rithet & Company.

 

Duvals Cottage, 1462 Rockland Avenue, Victoria, B.C. Duvals was the family home of Francis J. Barnard
Duvals Cottage, 1462 Rockland Avenue, Victoria, B.C. Duvals was the family home of Francis J. Barnard
The Church of Our Lord, 626 Blanshard Street, Victoria, B.C. Designed and built in 1876 by architect John Teague for Rev. Edward Cridge and the Reformed Episcopal Church
The Church of Our Lord, 626 Blanshard Street, Victoria, B.C. Designed and built in 1876 by architect John Teague for Rev. Edward Cridge and the Reformed Episcopal Church
Victoria Masonic Temple, 650 Fisgard Street. Built in 1878 with additions in 1909.
Victoria Masonic Temple, 650 Fisgard Street. Built in 1878 with additions in 1909.

Victoria Masonic Temple, 650 Fisgard Street

Designed and built in 1878 by architect John Teague, a member of Victoria-Columbia Lodge No. 1.

There was a major addition to the west end of the building in 1909.

 

 

 

Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Society building, designed by John Teague in 1885
Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Society building, designed by John Teague in 1885

 

Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association, Fisgard Street, Victoria

Designed and built in 1885 for the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association by architect John Teague, a member of Victoria-Columbia Lodge No.1 in Victoria.

 

 

Charles Hayward's house, built in 1885, is still standing at 1003 Vancouver Street in downtown Victoria (photo by Temple Lodge No. 33 Historian)
Charles Hayward‘s house, built in 1885, is still standing at 1003 Vancouver Street in downtown Victoria

Charles Hayward house, 1003 Vancouver Street

1003 Vancouver Street was designed and built in 1885 by architect John Teague (1883-1902), a member of Victoria-Columbia Lodge No. 1, for Charles Hayward (1839-1919), a member of Vancouver & Quadra Lodge No. 2.

Both John Teague and Charles Hayward served as Mayor of Victoria.

1003 Vancouver Street is listed on the Canadian Register of Historic Places and the Victoria Heritage Registry.

 

 

Gyppeswyck, originally the home of Alexander Alfred Green, built by contractor George Mesher. Now part of the Art gallery of Greater Victoria. (photo by Temple Lodge No. 33 Historian)
Gyppeswyck, originally the home of Alexander Alfred Green, designed by architect William Ridgway Wilson and built by contractor George Mesher. Now part of the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria.

1040 Moss Street, now part of the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. Gyppeswyck, now known as the Spencer Mansion, was built in 1888 for Alexander Alfred Green (a Freemason) by architect William Ridgway Wilson (a Freemason) and building contractor George Mesher (a Freemason).

Also see 1210-1216 Broad Street, which was built for Alexander Alfred Green in 1889 by architect/builder Thomas Trounce, a Past Grand Master.

This Heritage Building at 1401 Government Street/606-614 Johnson Street in downtown Victoria was built in 1888 as a store for Edward G. Prior's hardware business, E.G. Prior & Co.
This Heritage Building at 1401 Government Street/606-614 Johnson Street in downtown Victoria was built in 1888 as a store for Edward G. Prior’s hardware business, E.G. Prior & Co.

Prior Building, 1401 Government Street/606-614 Johnson Street was built in 1888 by architect Leonard Buttress Trimen for Edward Gawlor Prior (1853-1920), who used it for his hardware business, E.G. Prior & Co.

Edward Gawlor Prior was a member of Victoria-Columbia Lodge No. 1.

This building is listed in the Canadian Register of Historic Places.

 

1210-1216 Broad Street, Victoria. Built in 1889 by architect Thomas Trounce for Alexander Alfred Green
1210-1216 Broad Street, Victoria. Built in 1889 by architect Thomas Trounce for Alexander Alfred Green

1210-1216 Broad Street – built in 1889 by architect/builder Thomas Trounce (a Past Grand Master) for Alexander Alfred Green (a member of Victoria Columbia Lodge No. 1). The building was later used by Robert Burns McMicking and Edgar Crow Baker (both Past Grand Masters), who set up Victoria’s first telephone exchange in this building.

 

 

 

 

1407 and 1411 Government Street, Victoria, B.C. 1407 Government Street was built in 1889 by the Brackman-Ker Milling Company, which was owned by David Russell Ker, a member of Victoria-Columbia Lodge No. 1
1407 and 1411 Government Street, Victoria, B.C. 1407 Government Street was built in 1889 by the Brackman-Ker Milling Company, which was owned by David Russell Ker, a member of Victoria-Columbia Lodge No. 1

1407 Government Street was built in 1889 by the Brackman-Ker Milling Company, which was owned by David Russell Ker, a member of Victoria-Columbia Lodge No. 1.

Also see 1420 Broad Street, built by the Brackman-Ker Milling Company in 1907.

566-570 Yates Street, Victoria, B.C. Built for Lewis Lewis by architect Thomas Hooper in 1891.
566-570 Yates Street, Victoria, B.C. Built for Lewis Lewis by architect Thomas Hooper in 1891. The “L.Lewis” on the cornice refers to Lewis Lewis.

 

Duck's Building, Broad Street, Victoria, B.C. Built in 1892 for Simeon Duck.
Duck’s Building, Broad Street, Victoria, B.C. Built in 1892 for Simeon Duck.

Duck’s Building, 1314-1322 Broad Street

Duck’s Building was built in 1892 by architect William Tuff Whiteway (a Freemason) for Simeon Duck (1834-1905), Past Grand Master of B.C.

 

The Dalton Rocket condominiums, 755-765 Yates Street, Victoria, was originally the Dominion Hotel, owned and built by Stephen Jones, Past Grand Master of B.C. & Yukon
The Dalton Rocket condominiums, 755-765 Yates Street, Victoria, was originally the Dominion Hotel, owned and built by Stephen Jones, Past Grand Master of B.C. & Yukon
The Board of Trade Building, 31 Bastion Square, Victoria, B.C. Designed by architect Alexander Maxwell Muir in 1892.
The Board of Trade Building, 31 Bastion Square, Victoria, B.C. Designed by architect Alexander Maxwell Muir in 1892.

Board of Trade Building, 31 Bastion Square, Victoria B.C.

Designed and built in 1892 by architect Alexander Maxwell Muir, a member of Vancouver & Quadra Lodge No. 2 in Victoria.

The Board of Trade Building is listed on the Canadian Register of Historic Places.
 

 

 

 

1322 Rockland Avenue, Victoria, B.C. Built for <a href=1322 Rockland Avenue

Designed and built in 1894 by architect William Ridgway Wilson for Hewitt Bostock, a member of Victoria-Columbia Lodge No. 1.

Renovations were done to the house in 1915 by Victoria architect Samuel Maclure.

 

 

Simon Leiser's former warehouse at 524 Yates Street in Victoria was converted to condos in 2011.
Simon Leiser‘s former warehouse at 524 Yates Street in Victoria was converted to condos in 2011.

Simon Leiser & Co. warehouse, 524 Yates Street

This building at 524 Yates Street was built in 1896 by architect A.C. Ewart as a warehouse and office for Simon Leiser & Co., a wholesale grocer.

Simon Leiser (1851-1917) was a member of Vancouver & Quadra Lodge No. 2 in Victoria.

The building was renovated into condominiums is 2011.

727-729 Yates Street was designed and built in 1897 by architect John Teague for real estate investor Dr. F.W. Hall.
727-729 Yates Street was designed and built in 1897 by architect John Teague for real estate investor Dr. F.W. Hall.
1770 Rockland Avenue, Victoria, B.C. was designed and built in 1905 by architect Samuel Maclure for Biggerstaff Wilson, a member of Victoria-Columbia Lodge No.1
1770 Rockland Avenue, Victoria, B.C. was designed and built in 1905 by architect Samuel Maclure for Biggerstaff Wilson, a member of Vancouver&Quadra Lodge No.2

 

1420 Broad Street, built in 1907 by architect Francis Rattenbury for the Brackman-Ker Milling Company, owned by David Russell Ker, a member of Victoria-Columbia Lodge No. 1
1420 Broad Street, built in 1907 by architect Francis Rattenbury for the Brackman-Ker Milling Company, owned by David Russell Ker, a member of Victoria-Columbia Lodge No. 1

1420 Broad Street, built in 1907 by architect Francis Rattenbury for the Brackman-Ker Milling Company, owned by David Russell Ker, a member of Victoria-Columbia Lodge No. 1

Also see 1407 Government Street, which was also built by the Brackman-Ker Milling Company.

532 Herald Street, built in 1908-1909 as a warehouse for for Wilson Brothers. It is now condominiums.
532 Herald Street, built in 1908-1909 as a warehouse for Wilson Brothers. It is now condominiums.

532 – 536 Herald Street
532 Herald Street and 536 Herald Street were built in 1908-1909 for Wilson Brothers and B. Wilson Co. respectively. Biggerstaff Wilson, a member of Vancouver & Quadra Lodge No. 2, was a principal of both companies.

 

 

 

532 Herald Street (left) and 536 Herald Street (right), built in 1908-1909 for Wilson Brothers and the B. Wilson Co. Biggerstaff Wilson was a principal of both companies.
532 Herald Street (left) and 536 Herald Street (right), built in 1908-1909 for Wilson Brothers and the B. Wilson Co. Biggerstaff Wilson was a principal of both companies.

532 – 536 Herald Street

532 Herald Street and 536 Herald Street were built in 1908-1909 for Wilson Brothers and B. Wilson Co. respectively. Biggerstaff Wilson, a member of Vancouver-Quadra Lodge No. 2, was a principal of both companies.

 

 

 

Simon Leiser's house at 1005 St. Charles Street, Victoria, B.C.
Simon Leiser’s house at 1005 St. Charles Street, Victoria, B.C.

1005 St. Charles Street was designed and built i910-1911 by architect Samuel Maclure for Simon Leiser, a leading figure in late 19th and early 20th century Victoria business.

Simon Leiser was a member of Vancouver & Quadra Lodge No. 2 in Victoria.

This building is on the City of Victoria Heritage Registry.

 

 

1320-1324 Blanshard Street, Victoria, B.C. Built in 1913 by architect Thomas Hooper for Max Leiser, who opened it as the Kaiserhof Hotel
1320-1324 Blanshard Street, Victoria, B.C. Built in 1913 by architect Thomas Hooper for Max Leiser, who opened it as the Kaiserhof Hotel

Kaiserhof Hotel, 1320-1324 Blanshard Street

1320-1324 Blanshard Street was built by architect Thomas Hooper for Max Leiser, a member of Vancouver & Quadra Lodge No. 2 in Victoria.

The building originally opened in 1913 as the Kaiserhof Hotel, a German themed hotel and restaurant.

1320-1324 Blanshard Street is listed on the Canadian Register of Historic Places under the name Kaiserhof Hotel.

 

 

 

 

600-610 Courtney Street, Victoria, B.C. Built in 1913 for Stephen Jones, who was Grand Master of B.C. in 1925. (photo by Temple Lodge Historian)
600-610 Courtney Street, Victoria, B.C. Built in 1913 for Stephen Jones, who was Grand Master of B.C. in 1925. (photo by Temple Lodge Historian)

600-610 Courtney Street

600-610 Courtney Street in downtown Victoria was built in 1913 for Stephen Jones, a Victoria hotelier who also served as Grand Master of B.C. & Yukon in 1924-1925.

It was built as an addition to 901-905 Government Street, which was also owned by Stephen Jones. Both buildings are legally consolidated into a single building and are listed on the Canadian Register of Historic Places.

 

 

 

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