Buildings Associated With Freemasons – Victoria

As part of our Vancouver Island Masonic History Project series on Buildings Built For Freemasons, here is a page on the Green Building, also known as the Exchange Building, at 1210-1216 Broad Street at Trounce Alley in Victoria, B.C.

1210-1216 Broad Street, built for Alexander Alfred Green. This building was the location of Victoria's first telephone exchange, founded by Robert Burns McMicking
1210-1216 Broad Street, built for Alexander Alfred Green. This building was the location of Victoria’s first telephone exchange, founded by Robert Burns McMicking
1210-1216 Broad Street, Victoria. Built in 1889 by architect Thomas Trounce for Alexander Alfred Green
1210-1216 Broad Street, Victoria. Built in 1889 by architect Thomas Trounce for Alexander Alfred Green

This Heritage Registered building has several Masonic connections. It was built in 1889 by architect/builder Thomas Trounce (Past Grand Master 1885-86, a member of Victoria-Columbia Lodge No.1) for Alexander Alfred Green (a member of Victoria-Columbia Lodge, No.1).

After Alexander Alfred Green‘s death in 1891, this building became the site of Victoria’s first telephone exchange, set up by Robert Burns McMicking (Past Grand Master, 1894-95) and Edgar Crow Baker (Past Grand Master, 1883-85).

Thomas Trounce also built a second building, a mirror image of this building, on the opposite side of Trounce Alley. The second building burned down in a fire in 1910 and was replaced by the Central Building, 620 View Street.

This building was restored in the 1990’s by Victoria architect John Keay.

Another building built for Alexander Alfred Green is 1040 Moss Street, built in 1889, now part of the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria.

Gyppeswyck, originally the home of Alexander Alfred Green, built by contractor George Mesher. Now part of the Art gallery of Greater Victoria. (photo by Temple Lodge No. 33 Historian)
Gyppeswyck, originally the home of Alexander Alfred Green, built by contractor George Mesher. Now part of the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. (photo by Temple Lodge No. 33 Historian)

Would you like to leave a comment or question about anything on this page?