Due To COVID-19 Precautions Temple Lodge No. 33 Has Cancelled All Meetings Until Further Notice

Brethren,

The Worshipful Master and Senior Officers of Temple Lodge No. 33 have decided to postpone the Installation of Officers, presently scheduled for Saturday, April 4th. In addition, all Regular Meetings are cancelled
until the present COVID-19 emergency is resolved.

Fraternally,
R.W.B. Tom Tams,
Secretary
Temple Lodge No. 33
Duncan, B.C.

Duncan Masonic Temple, 1963 Canada Avenue, Duncan, B.C.
Duncan Masonic Temple, 163 Canada Avenue, Duncan, B.C.

Some Historic Photos of The Duncan Masonic Temple, Circa 1912-1915

Here are some historic photos of the Duncan Masonic Temple which we came across recently.

The first photo shows Canada Avenue (then known as Front Street) circa fall 1912 or sometime in 1913. We are using those dates because the Duncan Masonic Temple was built in the summer of 1912 while the building that is now the Duncan Christmas Heritage Mall, which was completed in 1914, does not appear in the photo.  The Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway Station, built in 1912, appears at the right of the photo with the word “DUNCAN” on its south facade.

Front Street (now Canada Avenue) in downtown Duncan looking northwest, circa 1912-1913. The Duncan Masonic Temple is in the center right.
Front Street (now Canada Avenue) in downtown Duncan looking northwest, circa 1912-1913. The Duncan Masonic Temple is in the center right.

The following photograph was taken from the upper storey of a building (since demolished) on Duncan Street looking northwest. The photo shows the E & N Railway Station on the left and the Duncan Masonic Temple on the center-right. We are guessing this photo was taken circa 1912-1913.

The E&N Railway Station (left) and the Duncan Masonic Temple (center) circa 1913-1914
The E&N Railway Station (left) and the Duncan Masonic Temple (center) circa 1913-1914

The following photograph shows Front Street (now Canada Avenue) looking southwest from Kenneth Street circa 1914.-1915. We are using those dates because the Duncan Christmas Heritage Mall, which was completed in 1914, appears in the photo adjacent to, and to the left of, the Duncan Masonic Temple, which is the building on the right of the photograph.

Front Street (now Canada Avenue) in downtown Duncan circa 1914. The Duncan Masonic Temple is on the right.
Front Street (now Canada Avenue) in downtown Duncan circa 1914. The Duncan Masonic Temple is on the right.

 
Here is a current photo of the Duncan Masonic Temple:

Duncan Masonic Temple, 1963 Canada Avenue, Duncan, B.C.
Duncan Masonic Temple, 163 Canada Avenue, Duncan, B.C.

Would you like to leave a comment or question about anything on this post?

McMillin Memorial Mausoleum, Roche Harbor, Washington

Mike Gains, of Vancouver & Quadra Lodge No. 2 in Victoria, has provided us with some photographs he took during a recent visit to the McMillin Memorial Mausoleum in Roche Harbor, Washington.

Freemasons travelling to Roche Harbor may want to visit this site, which contains a lot of Masonic symbolism.

McMillin Mausoleum information plaque, Roche Harbor, Washington (photo by Mike Gains, V&Q, No.2)
McMillin Mausoleum information plaque, Roche Harbor, Washington (photo by Mike Gains, V&Q, No.2)
McMillin Mausoleum, Roche Harbor, Washington (photo by Mike Gains, V&Q, No.2)
McMillin Mausoleum, Roche Harbor, Washington (photo by Mike Gains, V&Q, No.2)
McMillin Mausoleum entrance gate, Roche Harbor, Washington (photo by Mike Gains, V&Q, No.2)
McMillin Mausoleum entrance gate, Roche Harbor, Washington (photo by Mike Gains, V&Q, No.2)
Mike Gains of V&Q, Lodge, No. 2, at the McMillin Mausoleum, Roche Harbor, Washington. (photo by Mike Gains, V&Q, No.2)
Mike Gains of V&Q, Lodge, No. 2, at the McMillin Mausoleum, Roche Harbor, Washington. (photo by Mike Gains, V&Q, No.2)
McMillin Mausoleum, Roche Harbor, Washington. The seats hold the cremated remains of McMillin family members. (photo by Mike Gains, V&Q, No.2)
McMillin Mausoleum, Roche Harbor, Washington. The seats hold the cremated remains of McMillin family members. (photo by Mike Gains, V&Q, No.2)
Broken Column at the McMillin Mausoleum, Roche Harbor, Washington. (photo by Mike Gains, V&Q, No.2)
Broken Column at the McMillin Mausoleum, Roche Harbor, Washington. (photo by Mike Gains, V&Q, No.2)

John S. McMillin was a lawyer who went into the lime business in 1886. Lime is a key component of cement, which was the key component of concrete. After 1876, concrete was becoming an increasingly popular building material and McMillin’s Roche Harbor Lime Company was a key supplier of cement in the western US.

John S. McMillin was a friend of Robert Pym Butchart, whose limestone quarries and cement factory at Tod Inlet is now the Butchart Gardens.

John S. McMillin and Robert Butchart were both Freemasons and Masonic symbolism is openly visible throughout the McMillin Mausoleum.

The entrance stairway consists of 3 steps, followed by 5 steps, followed by 7 steps. This is covered in the Fellow Craft Degree.

The Broken Column is a frequent feature of Masonic graves.

The circumference and diameter of the columns are the same as those of King Solomon’s Temple.

Here are some pages with more information on the McMullin Memorial Mausoleum:

Here is a map showing the location of McMillin Memorial Mausoleum in Roche Harbor, Washington: